Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,547

    Default

    You could take a possible shortcut of looking at the rapid fire codes for other previous Resident Evil games and then if you own those games, just kind of see how it was found in them and try the same thing. The way I usually see rapid fire is with timers, either a timer is created and reduces to zero to allow you to fire again or else it updates an old timer and once the game time passes that updated timer it allows you to fire again.

    Another lazy method is finding your ammo in memory and then watching nearby memory while firing to see if anything keeps changing and then allowing you to fire again once it becomes zero.

    And now that I think about it, I'm surprised I never did anything as goofy as calling the fire function from within the fire function crashing to game. Since I even started off so dumb learning about the "lhu" operation on the PS2 from Pyriel with that pause-inducing memory scanner thing I did on the PS2, I had the game infinitely loop backwards if buttons didn't change and got lucky that Okami had some special thing in place or something to prevent idiots like me from crashing the game that way because other games crashed.

    If you instead find just the line of code that directly saves your new reduced amount of ammo and go up through the functions changing the first line of each to go the return address you are likely to start finding odd effects. Usually I change one that prevents me from firing my weapon, and then I go from there through the lines starting at the end of the function working to the beginning preventing things from being saved until I hopefully find a timer somewhere and find it. It's a better method when you have games that break up the reload timer into multiple reload timers like I had with Batman Arkham City and likely missed in other games without knowing.
    Last edited by bungholio; 05-07-2017 at 09:55:00 AM.

  2. Likes David Dezio liked this post
  3. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Many thanks Harry62! I might be a beginner in assembly language. But in what I emphasize, is that I learn fast. I love all this kind of things. I could spend a whole day looking for this kind of thing. I think it's not too late to learn a bit about hacking... but thank you very much, I'll read about the assembly language
    Quote Originally Posted by Harry62 View Post
    A code like rapid fire typically requires you to have knowledge of the assembly language. If you are a beginner then it will be difficult and I suggest you learn the basics first.
    Last edited by David Dezio; 05-07-2017 at 04:14:53 PM. Reason: Edit Words

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Yes! I was surprised by that. As calling the fire function from within the fire function crashing to game ...
    I had never heard that and thank you very much bungholio. I will try to do the things you have told me
    Quote Originally Posted by bungholio View Post
    You could take a possible shortcut of looking at the rapid fire codes for other previous Resident Evil games and then if you own those games, just kind of see how it was found in them and try the same thing. The way I usually see rapid fire is with timers, either a timer is created and reduces to zero to allow you to fire again or else it updates an old timer and once the game time passes that updated timer it allows you to fire again.

    Another lazy method is finding your ammo in memory and then watching nearby memory while firing to see if anything keeps changing and then allowing you to fire again once it becomes zero.

    And now that I think about it, I'm surprised I never did anything as goofy as calling the fire function from within the fire function crashing to game. Since I even started off so dumb learning about the "lhu" operation on the PS2 from Pyriel with that pause-inducing memory scanner thing I did on the PS2, I had the game infinitely loop backwards if buttons didn't change and got lucky that Okami had some special thing in place or something to prevent idiots like me from crashing the game that way because other games crashed.

    If you instead find just the line of code that directly saves your new reduced amount of ammo and go up through the functions changing the first line of each to go the return address you are likely to start finding odd effects. Usually I change one that prevents me from firing my weapon, and then I go from there through the lines starting at the end of the function working to the beginning preventing things from being saved until I hopefully find a timer somewhere and find it. It's a better method when you have games that break up the reload timer into multiple reload timers like I had with Batman Arkham City and likely missed in other games without knowing.
    Last edited by David Dezio; 05-07-2017 at 04:22:29 PM. Reason: Edit Words

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    652

    Default

    Functions have to be created with recursive calls in mind. If there isn't a way to end the chain of calls and bubble back up, the best you can hope for is an infinite loop. It's more likely the program will crash withing a few calls due to some odd exception, or, if that doesn't happen quickly, the system will lock up when all the stack space is consumed and necessary data gets stepped on.

  6. Likes dlevere, David Dezio liked this post
  7. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    And is it possible that you tell me an example with a game of how to create that with ps2dis? It does not have to be such a real example, but only with words and a little ps2dis, not to bother you. Or someone to help me in this? The truth is that I still do not understand how to start with all this ... if I could read some example made with some game of ps2 could understand. And sorry that I have not answered before, is that I am striving in my studies
    Quote Originally Posted by Pyriel View Post
    Functions have to be created with recursive calls in mind. If there isn't a way to end the chain of calls and bubble back up, the best you can hope for is an infinite loop. It's more likely the program will crash withing a few calls due to some odd exception, or, if that doesn't happen quickly, the system will lock up when all the stack space is consumed and necessary data gets stepped on.

  8. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    652

    Default

    You're asking for an example of a recursive function in a game? I don't think I can really do that for you. Recursion is one of those things that's a godsend when you need it, but 99.9% of the time you don't. If you're going to find recursion in a game, it would be something of a unicorn hunt in the high-level code. My guess is that you'd be more likely to find it in lower-level routines for rendering and media playback, but if there's a consistent need for recursion even at that level, it's likely to be encapsulated in drivers or on the hardware.

    The main reason is that true recursion requires the function to call itself, and the recursive calls continue to whatever depth is required. Then the whole thing bubbles back up to the original call. This is time-consuming and can be relatively costly in terms of system resources, which isn't good for a game. They have some large number of things they have to do in each game tick/frame, and waiting a recursive chain to complete can easily eat up too many cycles. Games typically function as "state machines", and break tasks down into units of what's required each frame. So if there actually was a task that might ordinarily lend itself well to recursion, it would probably be broken up into enough states to cover the worst case scenario of the game, and some part of it would be handled in each tick.

    A decay function for a sound effect might be a good example of something a game could conceivably handle recursively, but you'd have to look at the audio hardware. Even in the PS 1 days, that was something you requested from the SPU. If the SPU in some way does it recursively through software, it doesn't affect the game engine so much because a purpose-built piece of hardware is handling it. I'm about 90% sure that's all handled on the metal, though.

    In general computing terms, the go-to example of recursion is computing a factorial, e.g., 5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1. You can find examples of that all over the place. For something that might actually show up in gaming, you'd probably want to look to anything that has to handle syntax according to some sort of defined grammar. That is, anything that looks like a compiler or an interpreter. Any development kit for a game engine is likely to include some amount of recursion for handling syntax trees created in whatever scripting language they use. Hell, Omniconvert (a tool for converting PS2 codes between different cheat devices) has a small amount of recursion in it to handle nested conditional codes. Most PS2 cheat devices embed counts in the conditional codes, but the AR MAX uses terminator lines instead, so conditional code types go through a recursive algorithm that keeps track of how many lines are in the original and converted codes, and what the counts should be or where the terminators should be inserted. It also helps with validity checking. That tool is open source, if you want to take a look at it.

  9. Thanks! David Dezio, dlevere is thankful for this post
    Likes David Dezio, dlevere liked this post
  10. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pyriel View Post
    You're asking for an example of a recursive function in a game? I don't think I can really do that for you. Recursion is one of those things that's a godsend when you need it, but 99.9% of the time you don't. If you're going to find recursion in a game, it would be something of a unicorn hunt in the high-level code. My guess is that you'd be more likely to find it in lower-level routines for rendering and media playback, but if there's a consistent need for recursion even at that level, it's likely to be encapsulated in drivers or on the hardware.

    The main reason is that true recursion requires the function to call itself, and the recursive calls continue to whatever depth is required. Then the whole thing bubbles back up to the original call. This is time-consuming and can be relatively costly in terms of system resources, which isn't good for a game. They have some large number of things they have to do in each game tick/frame, and waiting a recursive chain to complete can easily eat up too many cycles. Games typically function as "state machines", and break tasks down into units of what's required each frame. So if there actually was a task that might ordinarily lend itself well to recursion, it would probably be broken up into enough states to cover the worst case scenario of the game, and some part of it would be handled in each tick.

    A decay function for a sound effect might be a good example of something a game could conceivably handle recursively, but you'd have to look at the audio hardware. Even in the PS 1 days, that was something you requested from the SPU. If the SPU in some way does it recursively through software, it doesn't affect the game engine so much because a purpose-built piece of hardware is handling it. I'm about 90% sure that's all handled on the metal, though.

    In general computing terms, the go-to example of recursion is computing a factorial, e.g., 5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1. You can find examples of that all over the place. For something that might actually show up in gaming, you'd probably want to look to anything that has to handle syntax according to some sort of defined grammar. That is, anything that looks like a compiler or an interpreter. Any development kit for a game engine is likely to include some amount of recursion for handling syntax trees created in whatever scripting language they use. Hell, Omniconvert (a tool for converting PS2 codes between different cheat devices) has a small amount of recursion in it to handle nested conditional codes. Most PS2 cheat devices embed counts in the conditional codes, but the AR MAX uses terminator lines instead, so conditional code types go through a recursive algorithm that keeps track of how many lines are in the original and converted codes, and what the counts should be or where the terminators should be inserted. It also helps with validity checking. That tool is open source, if you want to take a look at it.
    A thousand apologies please Pyriel. You talk to me like I'm a hacker and I'm just a beginner LOL. What I try to say with all of this is that I can not understand much about how to create a Rapid Fire code, and what you are telling me about steps I could take to be able to focus on finding or creating this specific code in games. I think also what you try to say is that it is dangerous to create these types of code? It's a shame ... I would have liked to understand how to locate myself to create these codes. It's not my pleasure to go asking for code. I think it's better to learn to do the things you try to look for or do, do not you think? I do not know if it is annoying for all of you to ask every time how to do each thing, in my case if I knew how to do all these things, I would take the trouble to create a page or something to instruct all people who like this . Even in the future, I would like to collaborate with this kind of thing in this community
    Last edited by David Dezio; 05-30-2017 at 09:02:01 PM.

  11. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    Would you recommend Pyriel? To follow through with all this or leave it? Because, it does not look very easy. And not to disturb anyone ... I feel tense not being able to grasp this LOL. And please thousand puzzles Pyriel
    Last edited by David Dezio; 05-30-2017 at 09:06:32 PM.

  12. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    652

    Default

    Oh, you wanted an example of how to make a rapid fire code? There has to be a tutorial for that somewhere, or even just one for infinite ammo.

    Unfortunately, I don't own the game you're looking at. I'm not even sure I still have any shooters for the PS2. I might have SOCOM in the attic somewhere, but at the moment going up there, dragging down a hypothetical disc, and creating a lesson with it isn't something I have time for. Sorry.

  13. Thanks! David Dezio is thankful for this post
    Likes David Dezio liked this post
  14. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Buenos Aires, Baradero
    Posts
    61

    Default

    LOL! Socom... brings back old memories of when I played it, I thought I was one of those few who played it. And it's a shame... I have the infinite ammo code of the game. But hey, I do not intend to steal anyone's time here

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Turbo Pad - Rapid Fire By Rinnegatamante (PS VITA/PS TV)
    By dlevere in forum Hacking Scene News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-23-2017, 04:21:03 PM
  2. [HELP] How to find Rapid Fire Codes
    By leon91 in forum School of Hacking
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 12-07-2015, 05:33:48 AM
  3. RE4 rapid fire code
    By faberb in forum Retro Hacking
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-22-2013, 10:06:00 AM
  4. New Rapid Fire Mod For XBox 360/PS3 Controllers
    By dlevere in forum Hacking Scene News
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-30-2012, 07:45:45 AM
  5. GoldenEye 007 Rapid Fire GameShark Hack
    By dlevere in forum GameHacking.org Updates
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-18-2012, 11:25:58 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •